Kidney Class Week #12

Happy Thursday! I am a day late and a dollar short again this week, lol. I guess it doesn’t matter which day I post these on, but I do try to stay consistent for my readers.

This week we are on slide #12 which has to do with HTN in relation to Kidney Disease. This slide is very self-explanatory, and if you want some videos and other information, the past two weeks also were about this topic. I have tons of posts in my archives on the topic of blood pressure, so you can browse there as well. High Blood Pressure is the #2 cause for Kidney Failure, right behind Diabetes at #1. It is imperative that you monitor your blood pressure routinely, even if you don’t have the condition. Catching and treating it early will help prevent long-term effects. I recommend you learn to take your own blood pressure with a manual cuff, or someone in your family, if you have CKD, already. If you can’t technology has improved the electronic monitors greatly. Just be sure and follow the instructions in the packet, and get a cuff size appropriate for the size of your arm. Keep a log of your blood pressure and share it with your doctor, whether you visit yearly, monthly, or weekly.

I am an AKF Kidney Coach. These slides are theirs. As a Kidney Coach I run the class, take comments, and answer questions based on their program, my experience with CKD, and my experience as a nurse. This is not medical advice nor should it be taken as such. It is informative and educational. This applies only to my Kidney Coach status with them. All other blog posts are mine and have nothing to do with AKF Kidney Coach classes.

Please leave me a comment if you have CKD, love someone who has CKD, have High Blood Pressure, or just have questions about the topic. I will answer all valid questions, and spam is deleted. If you would rather not make public comments, you can use the contact form below to send me an email and I will answer you there.

Scroll down to read this week’s slide.

what is diverticulitis?

Welcome to another Tuesday edition of Health Tips on Tuesday. August is Colon Health Awareness Month and I have been discussing Diverticulosis. Today, I am going to talk about Diverticulitis. It is a sister disease to Diverticulosis. You can read the other posts on this topic in the archives.

Diverticulitis is very common especially as we age. You have to have Diverticulosis to have Diverticulitis. Why? Because Diverticulitis is inflammation, and or infection, of the Diverticulum that are present in Diverticulosis. Remember that diverticulum are pouches that form usually in the lower colon and can not only become infected but also can blow, or perforate causing much larger issues.

There are 3 videos below that explain Diverticulitis and have images to help you visualize what I mean. It may be disturbing to some people, so watch wisely. The 3rd video is in Spanish, to explain it to any Spanish readers that may visit this blog. I only know a little Spanish, so I can not verify what he is saying. I tried to find it in Sign Language as well, but I could not locate any, except for one with signs for common symptoms. So, I will share that for any medical people so you can have at least some basic signs to communicate with hearing impaired patients.

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Tips on Tuesday: Learn To Wash Your Hands the Right Way

If you have a chronic illness, like me, then the doctors on the news are giving you no comfort when they say old people and people with underlying chronic illnesses are the ones getting the most serious illness from this new virus in the news.  That brings me no peace of mind, love, kindness or caring.  If you are young you will be fine, some of them have actually said that.  How awful!  At any rate, my point is most people do not wash their hands enough, or correctly.  When I was in nursing school handwashing was a huge part of our training.  You had to do it right, in all ways to pass this skill.  The video below goes through it in an excellent way.  The only thing I wish she had said was that if your hands get dry and cracked, then hand lotion should be used to help the healing process, as germs can enter into that cracked skin.  Watch the video, and practice the technique, it may just save your life or someone you love.  I will be doing more posts on this new virus topic because it is super important for people who have CKD.

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How To Get Rid Of Plantar Fasciitis!

Updated 2/3/2022:

As I stated last week, February is Heart Health Awareness Month.  My Thursday topics will be heart-related topics, especially in relation to CKD.  The 4 topics will be exercise, nutrition, stress, and cholesterol.  Plus, I am introducing a new monthly plan, called Walking Buddy.  That is right, I will be your walking buddy.  I will give more details in tomorrow’s post.  This plan will be strictly for people who want or need a walking partner. It is a virtual walking partner.

I got Plantar Fasciitis in early Summer last year.  Ooh, it was awfully painful.  I saw lots of websites claiming instant relief, or getting rid of it quickly.  While I hate to say something is untrue, I am telling you if you have a serious case, nothing will be quick.  It is a long, slow healing process.  But, there are things that will at least help alleviate the pain, and stress caused to your foot.  Hopefully, you only get it in one foot, not both.  I will share the things that actually work, and help the most.  It took mine 5 months to completely heal, but it can take up to a year, or longer if you don’t try some of these tips.  In the worst-case scenario, there is surgery, but I don’t think that happens very often.  So, here are the things that worked for me, in order of importance.

First, what is Plantar Fasciitis?  For most people, it means heel pain.  But, not everyone gets heel pain.  The Plantar Fascia runs all along the bottom of your foot, connecting your heel to your toes.  So, you can have an injury anywhere along there.  Mine was more towards the center of my arch.  If you have high arches, like me, you are more prone to get it, or flat feet too.  There are ways to tape and wrap, but they are very time-consuming, and I didn’t find it all that helpful.  I never tried taping but did do the ace wrap in ways meant to be helpful.

1-  Rest.  Yes, you must let it rest.  If you work on your feet all day, it is imperative that you not be on it, as much as possible, when you are not working.  This was torture for me.  By the end of the day, at first, the pain was almost unbearable.  People with CKD can only take Tylenol, which does not help inflammation.  This brings me to my next tip.

2- In the beginning especially, in the acute phase, use ice to decrease the inflammation.  You can apply ice any way you find that works, but what I found best is to put a water bottle in the freezer before I went to work, then roll my foot on it back and forth, after a long day on my feet.  Be sure to put a cloth between your foot and the ice.  This felt heavenly.  Some people find just rolling their foot on a tennis ball helps.  It did not for me.  I needed the ice.

3-  Do not exercise, as much as possible in the beginning.  When you do start to exercise again, take it slow.  It will not heal, and you can make it worse if you continue with your exercise regime.

4-  Now for the three products that I swear by.  The boot OMG, worn at night, as soon as I started wearing this, I started to see slow, but immediate results.  The little supports, I would wear in my shoe when I would work, or when exercising.  I tried the inserts first, and they not only didn’t help but seemed to make it worse.  But, those little beauties alleviated so much pain from being on my feet all day.  They are elastic, for compression to control swelling and softball support.  Just slip it over your foot and wear it all day., or night.  I bought both of these products at Walmart.  The boot was a little expensive but so worth it.  It stretches that tissue while you sleep.  Wear good shoes.  I love New Balance.  I wear them every time I walk, or work now, for long periods.  There are more expensive brands, but I find these work and are affordable.  My feet love these.  This brings me to my last point.

5-  Stretches.  There are lots of videos on Youtube that will help you do stretches for Plantar Fasciitis.  Along with the items I shared above, there were only 2 stretches, and one exercise I found actually helped.  The first stretch was actually quite difficult but really helped a lot.  You know how you stretch your fingers out away from each other?  Well, that is what you need to do with your toes.  At first, my toes wouldn’t do it.  It was like they were dumb and just couldn’t follow the command my brain was telling it.  So, I would use my fingers to force them apart.  But, slowly I was able to do it on command.  I still do this stretch on a regular basis.  The second one is similar to what the boot does.  Pull your toes towards your knee.  You can use a towel, or engage your calf muscle.  This is a great stretch for your calf muscle also.  The exercise that helped is rotating the foot in a complete circle several times, first clockwise, then counterclockwise.

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