Portion Distortion!

Well, it was an interesting past 7 days. My internet was in and out, and every afternoon went out for at least an hour. So, I have decided to try to blog in the mornings instead. I missed three scheduled posts last week, and I will get them done within this week. We had a tropical storm come by us, and it rained buckets for days.

I have started coaching my husband on diet and portion control. It is working quite well for him. He had no clue how much he was really eating. I am guessing a lot of people don’t follow the recommended portions on the food label of every food item. Plus, learning how much saturated fat is in fast food has really opened his eyes as well. He has already lost 5 pounds. Below you will see an image of my breakfast this morning.

This breakfast is one scrambled egg, 1/2 cup of skim milk, and 1 cup of Chex Vanilla cereal. This breakfast has 277 calories, and 12 grams of protein, and is the correct portion size of cereal and milk. The cereal may have a small amount of protein, but I had thrown the box away so I can’t say for sure. Cereal is a great option for breakfast. It is almost always fortified with vitamins and minerals. Be sure and try to find the lowest added sugar variety that you can tolerate eating. Why? Because, cereal is expensive and if you are not going to like it why buy it. If you add a 3 oz glass of orange juice, it will help the body absorb any iron in the cereal and egg. I do not tolerate orange juice well, so I don’t drink it. This portioned breakfast will help keep you going until lunch and give you a great start to your day.

How are your cereal portions? Check your portions, read the label, and realize how much you are really consuming.

If you need to lose weight this is a great place to start, proper portion control. If you are underweight, please disregard the portions I recommend. Chances are very good you actually need to eat more portions, and should seek the assistance. Believe it or not, being underweight can be just as dangerous to the body as being overweight.

Take care! If anyone is interested in learning more about my coaching services, please use the contact form below the image to message me. You can always email me at healthbuddymelissa@yahoo.com

Disclaimer

Eat Beets For A Better Memory!

This is an older post, that was updated on 9/27/2021/ Did you know Beets are good for  you?  Doesn’t matter that they taste a lot like dirt, they are really good for your brain.  Taking care of your brain can help your memory. Helping your memory may help prevent Dementia, and or Alzheimer’s.

No one at my house will touch beets, except me.  I am reading a book on juicing, and I am supposed to be adding beets to my smoothie everyday.  Unfortunately, I have not convinced myself to do so, yet.  I have seen the commercials for beet powder, instead of grinding up a beet, and thought maybe I would try some of that.  Maybe it doesn’t taste like dirt.  I haven’t actually bought any  yet, but if you have tried it let me know if it tastes like dirt. 

Since, I have CKD, and many who read this may as well, it is important that I tell you about some of the nutrition of beets.  Beets have no fat, well that is awesome.  They do however have a bit of Sodium, and Potassium.  1 cup of beets has 106mg of Sodium, and 442 mg of Potassium.  They are a good source of Iron, and Fiber though, also.  I use the website, or app, Eat This Much, to find out how much Phosphorus is in foods.  Beets have about 28mg per 1 cup.  That is actually pretty good.  Now the powdered beets, I don’t know the nutrition could be different.  So, make sure you are reading the label to make sure it meets your intake requirements.  I have seen ads proclaiming beets as a Super Food.

Why are beets good for the brain?  Beets are high in Antioxidants, which fight cancer, and Nitrates. Nitrates help increase blood flow to the brain.  Increased blood flow will help you to think more clearly, and help with attention span.  Beets are low in carbs, but they may help increase exercise performance. Watch the short video to learn more about beets.

Are beets prevalent where you live?  Do you like beets? Please share a delicious recipe for beets, or how you add them to smoothies. I get a lot of readers from other countries, so I am curious as to their local food sources.  If you wouldn’t mind leaving me a comment, I would appreciate it.

If you would like to learn more about how to improve your memory, or meet your health goals, use the contact form below to message me for a free health coaching assessment.

Disclaimer

You can find the Eat This Much app, in the Google Play Store.

Sign up for my Mailchimp newsletter!

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Portion Distortion: Corned Beef and Cabbage and CKD

Updated 3/7/2022: Sign up for my newsletter below, and on March 17, 2022, I will have a special offer for my newsletter subscribers.

Happy St Patrick’s Day.  This is the day that everyone is Irish, and wears green.  But, what about the most popular meal served on St Patty’s Day, Corned Beef and Cabbage?  Can you have it if you have CKD?  Of course, you can!  You just have to calculate how much you can have.  To do that you need to know the nutrients in Corn Beef, or at least the ones concerned with CKD;  Sodium, Potassium, Phosphorus, and Protein.  Read on to find out that info.  I will break it down according to how we made it.  I am unsure of the spice package my husband used, so leave a little more room to add some more Sodium.  I used Eat This Much, to figure out the amount of each item.  Don’t forget if you add anything to it when eating it, like Catsup, Mustard, Butter, whatever you have to consider that as well. Also, cooking methods, leaching, etc can change the nutrient values in food.

For 1 oz of Corned Beef, that is not a lot of corned beef folks, so if you eat 3 or 4 ounces be sure to multiply the amount by 3 or 4 depending on how much you eat. The nutrients are as follows and may not be exact so plan wisely.

Protein:  8 grams

Phosphorus:  31.5mg

Potassium:  38.6 mg

Sodium:  254 mg

Carrots, one serving is 1 cup:

Protein:  0.7 grams

Phosphorus:  25.2 mg

Potassium:  230 mg

Sodium:  50 mg

Potatoes, one serving is 1 cup:

Protein:  8 grams

Phosphorus:  210 mg

Potassium:  1553 mg   this is a very large amount

Sodium:  22 mg

Cabbage, a serving size is 1 cup:

Protein:  2 grams

Phosphorus:  50 mg

Potassium:  294 mg

Sodium:  12 mg

Since all kidney patients are different, one item may bother you more than others.  Like, for me Potassium is not an issue, but Protein and Sodium are.  Phosphorus is a complicated nutrient that I think more education should be centered on. So use the info to adjust how much you eat to stay within your limits.  If you do not know your limits,  or how to calculate what you are eating, message me using the contact form below, to set up a free meet and greet to see if I can work with you to help you learn how to track your intake.   Remember I am not a Dietitian, I am a Health Coach with a background in nursing, and a Kidney Patient.   I will assist you to learn how to calculate what you are eating, find resources that will help you to learn how much nutrients are in each food item, keep a food diary, etc.   Or, if you need to learn to communicate with your doctor to advocate for yourself in making health decisions, like requesting a Dietitian referral, requesting easier to understand education tools, etc.

Check out my Meals with Melissa subscription plan. It is not geared towards CKD, but rather a family, but I include tips to make it more CKD friendly, and one on one coaching can further assist.

Disclaimer

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.