Pantry Food Challenge With CKD and My Very Small Haul

Welcome to another Healthy tip on Tuesday! Today, my healthy tip, especially if you are doing a food pantry challenge, is to do an inventory of your pantry. We seriously have way more food than I even thought we did. We did a complete inventory yesterday. I am almost embarrassed to say, but I have purchased so many protein bars that I absolutely don’t love, but now I have to eat them. My husband will eat some, I hope. Protein bars are very expensive and I absolutely refuse to waste them. They are convenient for when I work my long 12 hour days, but I just don’t really care for them. From a CKD perspective please be careful. Some of these protein bars can have 30% of your RDA for phosphorus. I made a Google document for my whole pantry supply and each time we use something I will change the count. I was doing this last summer, but then the 12-hour shifts came and I got out of doing it. The point of a pantry challenge is to have no waste and to save money.

Last week I was able to save 57 dollars by shopping in my pantry. For me, my pantry is cupboards and a freezer. The fresh stuff of course I use up, but it isn’t shelf stable. That 57 dollars saved will go to dog training lessons for my crazy dog, or for me, whatever perspective you think about it. The budget is 21 dollars per person, per week. So, for a family of three, that is 63 dollars a week. It is for food items only. The real challenge is to see if shelf-stable foods can be both affordable and healthy choices for someone living with CKD. So far I have still been able to afford organic options, but that may not last once my existing inventory is gone. I do not generally shop for quick, easy, processed-type foods, either.

Today, I went to Walmart to get a very small food haul for this week. This should be all we need, but you know how that goes. Milk, Tampico, bag salad, pretzels, coffee creamer, and the lunch meat all came to a total of $19.56. So, that means for the rest of this week, which ends on Sunday we have $43.44. My son and his wife may be coming to visit Sunday, and we may get some pizza. This will probably come from this fund. I did not buy Organic milk because the price has gone up quite a bit, and I don’t drink it. Tampico is for my teenager. The bagged salad was actually 40 cents cheaper than the app said it was, woot woot! We did not technically need lunch meat, but my husband does not want to eat tuna every day, of which I have a ton, so I picked up some lunch meat.

Tonight, for dinner from my pantry I am using some pasta, chicken bullion cubes, chicken stock, a whole chicken, carrots, and onion. I am making homemade crockpot chicken noodle soup. Everything in this recipe is organic and already in my pantry.

To keep organic carrots fresh longer I peel and slice them up, and then I put them in a jar of water in the fridge. This maintains their crispness for at least two weeks. I had to chop the peppers and freeze them because they were going bad faster than we could eat them.

I cook the whole chicken all by itself, with just water, in the crockpot for six hours. Then it is fall off the bone tender. Throw that water away. I know it sounds like such a waste, and maybe it is. But, in that water is a lot of the phosphorus from the chicken. This method reduces the phosphorus in meat and I use it often. I then take the chicken apart and put the meat back in the crockpot with organic chicken broth that does not have added phos in the ingredients. I do add bullion cubes for flavor, along with Rosemary, Thyme, Organic, and my secret ingredient Paprika. If this is too salty for you use low sodium broth. I cook it for a few more hours until the carrots are soft. Then I add some pasta and cook for about 15 more minutes or until the pasta is done. I only used about 1 pound of chicken in the whole soup. It is hard to measure the protein this way, but you can kind of guess.

There will be enough of this for lunch tomorrow, and I didn’t use all of the chicken so that will be another meal this week, either for lunch or dinner. There are also still some homemade meatballs with sauce in the fridge. My husband will most likely finish those off.

Tomorrow will be the 3rd slide in the Kidney Class. So, be sure and come back to see what it is.

Tomorrow, I have a late meeting, so I might make homemade bread in the morning and we can have grilled cheese and tomato soup on homemade bread. Yum!

Please remember my kidney disease is not the same as anyone else. We are all different. What I eat you may not be able to eat. Proper portions are always the key to any specialized diet, and I am not on dialysis. If you have any questions, there is tons of information already on this blog about me and my kidney journey, or you can leave me a comment. If you would like to learn more about my Health Coaching services please send me an email to melissa@healthybuddymelissa.coach

Disclaimer

Who Likes Squats?

I would say most people do not like to do squats, but some people probably do. The other day I was reading an article on bone health and preventing Osteoporosis. With CKD you know how important bone and muscle health is. Squats were considered one of the best weight- bearing exercises you could do for bone health. I mean think about it, you are lifting your own weight from a seated to a standing position and then back to seated. The article stated that women in certain cultures who regularly sit on the floor have the best bone density in that study. This is because they have to get up and then down to the floor several times a day. I mean think of it this way, say you have an office job but you get up from your chair at least every hour and take 250 steps. In an 8 hour work-day, that means you would have done at least 8 squats as long as your chair is not high. Even if you have an active job, doing squats will improve your bone density.

Watch the video to learn how to properly do a squat. Start low and build up to more repetitions. Your buns and hamstrings probably will complain, especially at first, but your bones will thank you.

Now for a quick update on the pantry food challenge.

I looked up rolled oats that I used in my blueberry crisp and 1/2 of a cup contains 17 grams of protein, 66 grams of carbs, 11 grams of fiber, 523 mg of Phosphorus, 2 mg of Sodium, and 429 mg of Potassium. This makes oats a concerning food item for CKD. The recipe called for 3/4 of a cup of oats. Be sure and eat the blueberry crisp in moderation only. The homemade sloppy joe sauce was amazing! Compared to Manwich sloppy joe sauce in a can, it has much better nutrition for CKD, namely in sodium content and it contains HFCS. The frozen corn per 1/2 cup has 3 grams of protein, 3 mg of sodium, 213 mg of potassium, and 70 mg of phosphorus. Be sure and be mindful of portion sizes with the corn as well.

Today is an all-leftover dinner day. So, anything I have already cooked will be finished up today.

This weekend is the hardest for me, any weekend- because I work 12-hour shifts. On the first day I can manage a healthy meal, the second day I am too tired and with little sleep not much time to get something together. I may go ahead and prep a bunch of stuff today so I can eat healthy both days. Below are some pantry items I have thrown into my lunch bag in case I don’t get prepped for Sunday. We can eat at work for free, but I find the food generally upsets my stomach so I try not to. I have shown just the item and the labels.

The first item is for Poptarts. The list of ingredients is immense, but I forgot to take a picture. Then a bag of Cheez Its, Quest protein bar, a tun pouch, and Canola mayo I bought that Canola mayo through Misfits Market and I have not tried it yet. I think I will make tuna, and chicken salad so I have something for both days. The only real difference is that it has more Omega 3 than other mayos do and less saturated fat. The Quest protein bars I need to eat up. According to one website, one bar contains 10% of the RDA for phosphorus. I bought them and didn’t love them, but I refuse to waste them. They are so expensive. I have to eat three meals at work because I work 12- hour shifts. I will probably have my last serving of blueberry crisp before I leave for breakfast. I will also stick in a banana, and maybe some clementines. These are high in potassium so they will not work for everyone. That will avoid a fattening greasy breakfast there. If you work with CKD you know how hard it can be to stick to a diet and to get enough fluids. Fluids are an even bigger concern for me than food. As far as pantry meats go, you really can’t beat tuna. Try to buy the brand with the best ingredient list. I have tried organic tuna and I do not like it at all.

Have an awesome weekend and let me know how you plan for workdays with CKD.

Disclaimer

Living With CKD Pantry Food Challenge

So, if you read my post yesterday then you know I have two challenges for the whole year in 2022. The budget challenge is to save extra money, and you know what my phone died last night and I had to get a new one. So, isn’t that interesting!

Anyway, I will try to post most days what I ate from my pantry in our meal plan for the week. The days that I can’t get on, will all be posted on Monday. The week runs from Monday to Sunday. I will give generals for breakfast because we all eat something different. So, mostly I will share what I ate for those two meals.

So, for the budget challenge for this week, I have 63 dollars per week to spend. I figured I pretty much had everything I need for the week but then I decided to make my own hamburger buns for some sloppy joes. I don’t have enough flour. So, tomorrow I will be picking up some all-purpose flour from Walmart. Their 5-pound bag of Organic All-Purpose Flour is $3.98. This means for the week ending 1/16/2022 I have a remaining balance of $59.02. I could have gotten a cheaper bag, and at some point in this challenge I may have to, but as long as I can get organic I will. This is the perfect time of year to make my own bread because it is cool outside. I think I shared what I ate yesterday if not submarine sandwiches and the only thing from the pantry was condiments and pretzels. We already had the sub rolls and lunch meat on hand. I ate organic turkey breast from Misfits Market. It is delicious but not cheap.

Today, this is what I have and or will eat.

Breakfast: egg casserole. This was leftover from last week and needed to be eaten up.

Lunch: Fresh green salad. I had all of the supplies on hand. From my pantry, I used croutons that need to be used up, salad dressing, and we had some Star Wars chicken nuggets in the freezer. Freezer items count as pantry items in this challenge. You can see the food labels below. These are not the healthiest for someone with CKD so be sure and eat only a portion which is 4 nuggets. I just break them up and put them on my salad.

Note: With the egg casserole that has cheese in it, and the chicken nuggets I am already at my protein limit that I like to be at for the day. So, my meat portion for dinner will have to be even less. Plus, the nuggets were quite high in sodium.

Dinner: Pork loin chops from my freezer, canned organic green beans, and I think I will make some red potatoes in the air fryer. I do not love my air fryer at all, but I think I am finally getting the hang of it and learning to at least like it. My Instapot and my Crockpot both died in 2021 and I have not replaced them yet. All of the food items for this dinner we already had on hand. I don’t have the label for the pork loin. I bought it at Sam’s in a huge log and then we cut it into serving-size pork chops. I can get at least 5 meals out of this one large loin. Extra-lean pork loin is OK for CKD in 3 to 4 ounce serving size. If Phosphorus is a concern for you, you can parboil it for about 5 minutes to decrease the phosphorus in the meat. Potatoes are high in potassium, so soak or parboil them as well prior to putting them in the air fryer. From my spice cabinet, I can add Rosemary, and Paprika to add tons of flavor to the potatoes. If salt and pepper are all you have, then use them, just be light on the salt shaker. I do encourage you to build up your spice cabinet. They add tons of flavor without added salt, most of the time, read the labels.

That’s it for today. Have a great day! Leave me your thoughts in the comments. Note the expiration date on the organic green beans. Not all organic foods go to waste faster. Please remember all CKD patients are different. If your doctor has told you not to eat any of the foods I share then don’t eat them.

Disclaimer

A New Food Budget Challenge And Pantry Cooking With CKD

Hello, and welcome to another Mindful Monday topic. Part of Mindfulness is being aware of what you are spending your hard-earned money on. All of 2021 we spent paying off debt, and not buying more stuff unless it was with cash as much as possible. We spent down so much of our debt and were able to save quite a bit of money including paying for all of Christmas with cash only. This year we want to buckle down even more. With about 13 years to retirement, my husband and I want to really save more and plan better for our senior years. My last child will be 18 in just a few months. Below you will learn about two new challenges for my family for the year 2022. I will share both the success and unsuccess which hopefully there won’t be. Two things that I have eliminated from our budget are my Kindle Unlimited subscription and my Sam’s club membership. Why? My Kindle is old, and slowly not working anymore. I have chosen not to buy another so I don’t need the Kindle Unlimited anymore. I have had it for like 10 years and it was well worth every dime. I went to Sam’s for the last time today and bought a bunch of stuff. We have decided with my daughter soon to have her own job and most likely eat her own food, we will not need to buy in bulk so much and I honestly hate having all that stuff lying around. I am not knocking Sam’s it is a great store and it served us well, we just don’t need it anymore.

The two challenges for 2022 are the 21 dollars per person food budget challenge and the pantry cooking challenge. Below are the rules. The food budget is only for food items. It does not include non- food items such as toiletries, laundry, etc.

  1. For the 21 dollars per person food budget challenge it is basically what it says. I will spend 21 dollars per person, with three of us that is 63 dollars per week for groceries. This is a huge reduction in our food budget and all monies saved will go directly into our savings account. Once my daughter either moves, out or is eating the majority of her meals with her own money, it will go down to 42 dollars per week. For holidays and special occasions any monies saved can go towards that. We can use existing foods on hand. I have seen some people do this challenge and they charge themselves for the food they have on hand, including in that budget. You already paid for it once why on earth would you do that? I won’t be doing that. I will probably post weekly what we ate and if the items were already on hand or I had to buy them. In the beginning we should save quite a bit because I have stocked up. However, my family tends to not follow well on the weekends when I am at work. This will have to stop. I am not sure at how successful this will be, but I love a good challenge. I will start keeping a log tomorrow of what we eat, and probably post next Monday for the week. Food is so expensive right now and I do prefer organic foods, but I may have to not have that for this challenge. I hope not, though.
  2. The Pantry Cooking with CKD Challenge will have a lot to do with #1 since I have a good stock of foood already built up. For my challenge pantry items will be any item in a can, freezer item, box, or package. That basically means no fresh foods will count. We won’t be eating just from our pantry. That is not the challenge, though it is a good one. The purpose of my challenge is to share food items, and or serving sizes of pantry and shelf stable foods that someone with CKD can eat. I do buy organic when I can, but with the food buget this may not be possible all the time. If you do buy pantry organic items be sure and check the expiration dates and rotate them appropriately. Organic foods are not typically going to last months, or years because they don’t have all of those additives and preservatives. Each time I get the time to do a post on this topic I will.

Today, I am going to share peanut butter, because who doesn’t have peanut butter in their pantry? OK, if you are allergic you probably don’t The images below for the full nutrition information.

Organic MaraNatha Peanut Butter. I bought this from Misfits Market. I love it, my husband hates it. I bought this at the beginning of December, and it expires on January 26th of this year. So, you can see it does not have a very long shelf life. However, it is only 16 ounces so it will be gone in time. I put this in my smoothies and it is delicious.

The second image is Jif Peanut Butter and my husband’s choice of peanut butter. I bought this 3-pound jar in 2021 and it does not expire until 2023. When it is hurricane season this is a wonderful item to have on hand.

Let’s compare the 2.

From a CKD standpoint, I am concerned with Fat, Fiber, Sodium, Protein, Potassium, added preservatives, and other additives.

The organic peanut butter per serving, has 3 grams of Sat fats, 65 mg of sodium, 2 grams of fiber, 1 gram of added sugars, 8 grams of protein, and 4% of daily potassium. The ingredients are organic peanuts, organic palm oil, organic evaporated cane sugar, and sea salt. That is it. It also says it is sustainably sourced palm oil and recycled glass.

The Jif has per serving, 3.5 grams of saturated fats, 140 mg of sodium, 2 grams of fiber, 2 grams of added sugar, 7 grams of protein, and 4% of daily potassium. Of note, the Jif also has 2% of daily calcium. The ingredient list states that it is made from roasted peanuts and sugar contains 2% or fewer molasses, fully hydrogenated rapeseed and soybean oils, mono and diglycerides, and salt. It also states it contains no artificial preservatives and the package may be recycled but maybe not where you live. Certified NSF NON GMO. The sodium in Jif is more than double the organic option.

What are mono and diglycerides? They are fats that are used as emulsifiers. So, when organic peanut butter needs stirring because the oil separates, non-organic peanut butter does not need stirring. I think I will just stir my peanut butter. These additives have small amounts of trans fats, and I don’t need them, nor do you probably. However, with that said there is no sense buying a food item if no one will eat it. If your family prefers Jif, then eat it, in moderation and with proper serving sizes. My husband may eat the organic if he had to, but he doesn’t have to so he won’t.

So, that is it for this week. Be sure and follow this blog to learn along with me.

Disclaimer

Walk With Me

Reiki for Stress

It’s A New Day Coaching Plan

Use the contact form below to send me a message with questions or to ask about my coaching plans.

Thanksgiving Turkey Mediterannean Style!

Hello, and welcome to another Food on Friday topic. Since it is the month of November, and in the USA that means Thanksgiving, and Thanksgiving means turkey, and it is Dementia month on this blog. Well, you get the idea of today’s topic.

Studies show that following the MIND Diet, and or the Mediterannean Diet may help prevent Dementia. So, I thought I would try to find a video on how to make a Mediterannean style Thanksgiving turkey. Now, I am not sure my husband will go for this. He is responsible for cooking the turkey, not me. He enjoys it! I know it’s crazy! But, I can certainly put the idea in his head. I am not a huge lover of Greek yogurt, but I can half the amount and increase the Olive Oil, instead. I found some of the seasoning blend, mentioned in the video on Amazon. That is not an affiliate link. Turkey is very low-fat meat, especially if you eat only white meat, and avoid the skin. Watch the video below to learn how to make your own Mediterannean Thanksgiving Turkey. Turkey does contain Phosphorus, as do most meats, naturally. So, be mindful of your portion sizes if you have CKD and especially if you have issues with phosphates.

Disclaimer

Sign up for my Mailchimp newsletter!

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Recreating A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving Feast!

Welcome, to another Throwback Thursday topic. I am probably going to extend my Dementia topic into the month of December because there are so many topics I want to cover that center around the holidays of Thanksgiving and Christmas.

If you are in your 50’s or older you most likely watched A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving every single year. I know I did, and I watched it with my children as well. Sometimes it is hard to find, which is a shame, and I have to watch it on Youtube. This year it will not be on CBS, it will be on PBS on November 20th. Be sure and find your local PBS station and mark your calendar.

If you read my blog pretty consistently then you know I have started a family cook-off-night competition. We do this every two weeks on a Monday. There are several reasons I started doing this, such as family fun, we homeschool and it gets my daughter in the kitchen and can count as an elective credit, we learn creativity and budget planning. My husband has already picked the theme for his judging turn and it will be this coming Monday. That means it is my turn on the Monday of Thanksgiving week. Guess what my theme will be?

You probably have noticed that food prices are higher, and the news is starting to report that there may not be enough turkeys for Thanksgiving or maybe not as big ones. I know we get stuck on our traditional foods for holidays, but would that really be such a tragedy? Would it be so bad to just be thankful for being with family and the ones you love? Should it really matter if you don’t have a 4,000 calorie day of eating? I am not sure, let’s think about it. I think my husband would be devastated as Thanksgiving is his favorite holiday. But, I also think there is a lot to be said about being humble, and grateful for what you have rather than what you want. Is this the year we all consider the real meaning of Thanksgiving, and maybe it isn’t a gargantuan meal? What do you think? Let me know in the comments.

So, what about the meal created in Charlie Brown’s Thanksgiving meal. What kind of nutrition does it have? According to this website, the meal contains around 500 calories and nearly 100 grams of carbs. Of course, you could eat more and increase the calories. But, what about a modern version of this meal. Could it be made healthier while sticking to the basic premise of the meal? That is the question and will be the theme of my next family cook-off challenge, on November 20th, which coincidentally is the same day the special will air. I will definitely take pictures this time to share on the blog. Technically, if you think about it, on the show they all end up going to grandma’s for Thanksgiving dinner, so this could technically be an appetizer. That is something to think about, too. Below are two videos of people that have recreated the dinner. One is very traditional and the other puts a little more effort into making it homemade. Be sure and check them out.

If you would like to join in on this challenge be sure and share a link in the comments to your post, or video, so everyone can see your results. I will read, view, and share anyone who comments on their results, or thoughts. Please do not spam me. All comments are moderated and spam never shows up here on this blog, so don’t waste your time.

Have fun with this one! If you are a homeschooler like me, this is a great activity to do with your kiddos, young or old. Bonus points if you set the table the same way as in the show. You do not have to do it the same day I do, any day in the month of November is fine.

Disclaimer

Sign up for my Mailchimp newsletter!

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Throwback Thursday: Why Obesity Was Rare In The 50’s

Hello, and Happy Thursday! I have had a crazy week and I feel like I have totally neglected my readers. I still have so much to discuss on the topic of Obesity, and the month is almost over. My newsletter was supposed to go out yesterday, but I will literally not home at all yesterday enough to do it. So, it will go out today.

I know people don’t like the topic of overweight, and obesity, and how much we really eat past what our bodies need. But, the truth is, for most people, if you are overweight you are consuming too much food, and not moving enough. That is just the facts. Stored fat is just unused energy. The body stores it like a savings account. You didn’t spend the energy, so you saved it.

I did another blog post a while back about how portion sizes have changed through the years. You can read it here. I have a whole section on portion distortion under the category section.

Another thing people really don’t want to discuss is how inactive we really are, compared to past times, and even as soon as the 80’s when technology really exploded. I think I want one of those old washing machines shown in the video. I don’t know as I would do all laundry that way, but what a simple way to burn some extra calories doing something I have to do anyway. I don’t know about scrubbing floors and rugs on my hands and knees though. That is a bit much, lol. Anyway, we move way too little, and sit way too much. Desk jobs, automation, and technology have made our lives so much easier that it is effecting us in negative ways. Be sure and watch the video of the young lady who only ate proper portions for the day. She is thin, but is used to eating way over standard portion sizes. She is funny, but you will get the point.

There are a couple of videos below to help you better understand on why we are storing so much energy, instead of using it up. I think you might be surprised. I was. If you would like to start being more active, check out my Walking Buddy Plan.

Disclaimer

Sign up for my Mailchimp newsletter!

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Don’t Take My Chocolate!

Hello, and welcome to another Thinking on Thursday topic. Today, we are going to think about chocolate. I know controversial, right? But, for this month’s Health Challenge, I have been discussing Oxalates, and chocolate is very high in Oxalates. Well, sort of. Keep reading to learn more.

I have talked about chocolate before. Mostly in reference to chocolate being high in Phosphorus and Potassium. But, now I find out it is also high in Oxalates.

Yesterday, was National White Chocolate Day. I thought I always disliked white chocolate, but now I think I am in love. Why?

Strictly for the topic of Oxalates here are the differences in the types of chocolates, according to my Oxalates app:

  1. A serving size of 1.75 ounces of dark chocolate has 78 mg of Oxalates, and that is for 45-59% cocoa. It gets worse from there.
  2. The same serving size of milk chocolate has 39 mg of Oxalates. That is not horrible if you only eat that serving size.
  3. White chocolate and you get a more generous serving size of 2.5 ounces only has 3 mg of Oxalates. Oh yeah!

That is only for the chocolate. It does not include nuts, caramel, or peanut butter so be cautious.

As for the other concerns for chocolate, according to Davita 1 cup of chocolate chips contains at least 500 mg of Potassium, and at the very end of the spectrum 190 to 500 mg of Phosphorus. Thank goodness you wouldn’t eat all that at once, lol. Semi sweet chips are lower than milk chocolate chips. As for white chocolate, 1 cup of white chocolate chips contains 486 mg of Potassium, 299 mg of Phosphorus. So, while white chocolate is slightly better you do need to be mindful when you are eating these kinds of snack foods. One dietitian recommended that you limit your serving size of chocolate too a 100 calorie serving. Just for a more accurate visual of what 100 calories of chocolate would look like it would be 3 1/2 squares out of a whole bar of chocolate. That is not a lot of chocolate. But, if you can not live without chocolate at least there is an option. If you are on Dialysis please be sure and speak to your doctor before you consume chocolate. There is a video below for you to watch. I only watched the very first question because it pertained to chocolate. The rest of it was on other food topics related to CKD. She gives an interesting perspective on chocolate.

While researching this topic I found this website, that showed me what 100 calories of various snacks actually looks like. You might be surprised.

I did make a banana bar snack last week, and I put white chocolate chips in it with the idea of posting it today. Unfortunately I can not find where I put the recipe, and I am hoping I did not throw it away as it was super delicious and everyone loved it. I had worked out the stats per serving for Oxalates, Calories, Phosphorus. When I find it I will share it.

Do you love chocolate? Do you have CKD?

Disclaimer

Sign up for my Mailchimp newsletter!

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Should You Avoid Everything But the Bagel Seasoning With CKD?

Hello, and happy Monday! I hope everyone had an awesome weekend. It is finally getting to be a smidge cooler in the mornings, and I can enjoy my coffee outback on the swing. If you have been following along then you know for this month I am discussing Oxalates and how they can effect CKD, and other parts of the body. It is taking me a while to put together a long post on Oxalates in general, and how they effect other parts of the body besides kidneys. I will leave links to all of the posts I have done on this topic so far, so you can find and read them. It is very interesting and understudied topic, to me anyway, because I feel like I probably am sensitive to Oxalates.

Just a note that I love Trader Joe’s and I am not picking on their brand of Everything But the Bagel Seasoning. I am sure they are all similar, but this is the one I have on hand and was consuming regularly up until my strange symptoms begin. See my first post on this topic for more info on that. This seasoning is delicious and adds a nice little punch to food. You can see the ingredients below, but of concern is the Sesame Seeds and the Poppy Seeds. It does have a bit of Sodium as well. A serving is a 1/4 of a tsp, and trust me that is hardly anything at all. Check out this image, to see what I mean. According to my Oxalate app tracker Sesame Seeds contain 324 mg of Oxalates per 1 tbsp, and Poppy Seeds contain 34 mg of Oxalates per tbsp. Unless you are only using the recommended serving size of this seasoning, you could be consuming way too many Oxalates, especially if you have CKD. Oxalates are tiny nano crystals that build up in the urine because the kidneys can’t remove the Oxalates efficiently anymore. You don’t have to get a kidney stone for this to be an issue with CKD.

I sadly have stopped eating this seasoning, at least for now. My symptoms have improved by changing my diet, and I feel like I am back to baseline. My kidneys were actually improving, and at my last doctor visit I was back to stage 2. But, then I went back to stage 3A. So, I would live to be and stay at stage 2. Anything that is potentially going to make my kidneys work harder, and I don’t need it, I will try to avoid. I will eventually go back to using this seasoning, but in smaller amounts, and I will be Mindful of the other foods I eat in a day to be sure I stay right around 100 mg of Oxalates per day.

Please don’t just stop eating foods with Oxalates. You can cause something called Oxalate Dumping. Speak to your doctor, or request a Dietitian referral if you think you are sensitive to Oxalates, or are having strange symptoms especially during Summer months when Oxalate foods are probably higher consumed. If you are Vegan, Vegetarian, or even Keto, and you are having symptoms that are unusual to you seek the advice of a trained Dietitian to see if Oxalates may actually be causing you harm.

If you would like to learn more about how a Health Coach can help you reach your eating lifestyle goals, send me a message using the contact form at the end of this post.

Disclaimer

Other posts on this topic:

Sign up for my Mailchimp newsletter!

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Oxalates and Kidney Disease, CKD!

Hello, and welcome to another Wellness Wednesday topic. Today, I am continuing with my monthly theme of oxalates. The most common symptom of having too much Oxalates in your body is manifested as Kidney Stones. Kidney stones are extremely painful, and if you have ever had one you know this. But, you may not actually form a stone, and the oxalates may cause smaller crystals to form that never are large enough to cause a stone. But, these crystals can still cause harm to the kidneys, or progression of Kidney Disease if you already have CKD. Even small amounts of crystallization may decrease urinary output, cause retention, as well as other metabolic issues, and electrolyte balance. A lot of this stuff involves Biology and Chemistry, and is quite a complicated body process. But, using the NKF website, and other sources I have found, I hope to break it down for you in a simple, understandable way.

You can read my first post on this topic here. Each post explains something different, and addresses a different issue regarding Oxalates. In my second post I shared how to make a Low Oxalate Green Smoothie, especially if you are a huge smoothie drinker. Today, I am going to focus solely on the issue of Oxalates related to kidney function.

According to the NKF, there are ways to decrease your risk of Oxalate crystallization and stone formation including:

  1. Drink more fluids. See the video below to learn how to know if you are drinking enough liquids based on your urine color. There are some others I would like to point out such as cloudy urine, and bubbly urine. These can be signs that you are not drinking enough. I typically get a headache when I am dehydrated and it is a warning sign to me to drink more. When I am at work is most often when I will become dehydrated due to the nature of being a nurse and being busy. But, now I force myself to drink more at work. It is still not always enough, but I am working on it. If you are on fluid restrictions, again, ask your doctor what amount is right for you.
  2. Do not over eat protein. Before someone on the Carnivore or Keto Diet gets their undies in a bunch, please watch the two videos below on this topic. Too much protein can cause Kidney Stones which causes Kidney Damage, period! Do not take your protein requirements from an influencer, ask your doctor. I base my protein intake on a formula from a Urology website. My doctor is aware of how much protein I consume, and monitors my labs. I do think the amount he recommends at the end of his second video is probably too high, even if you don’t have Kidney Disease, but ask your doctor. Your doctor who is responsible for monitoring and analyzing your health.
  3. Eat less salt. I talk about this at nauseum. Too much salt leads to too much calcium in your urine which can lead to crystals forming, and or stones. I didn’t really understand why this was, but there is an actual explanation. Click here to read more. Salt is in all processed foods. Read labels and learn what amount of salt is healthy for you, but years ago when nurses actually had time to teach patients a 2 or 3 GM Sodium Diet was the norm. That is 2,000 to 3,000 mg of Sodium per day.
  4. How many of you take a Calcium supplement? Calcium supplements may actually increase your risk of stone formation in the kidneys, where as consuming dairy products actually can help. Dairy combines with Oxalates in the intestines keeping them from needing to be removed by the kidneys, and are rather excreted in the stool. Calcium from supplements do not do that. Be sure and click the NKF source at the top to read more about this. Talk to your doctor about getting a good source of Calcium in your diet.
  5. What about your Multivitamin? Does it have Vitamin C? I will be doing a whole post on Vitamin C, but the natural breakdown of Vitamin C is Oxalates. The food industry has added Vitamin C to just about everything. Now there could be a debate as to whether the body even absorbs that form of Vitamin C, or if it is all completely excreted in the kidneys without being used by the body at all. Talk to your doctor about whether you really need Vitamin C supplementation. Some people do. and your doctor will let you know. So many influencers suck down a million vitamins a day instead of just eating actual food.
  6. Eat foods not high in Oxalates. See my first post highlighted above.

Does this mean you can’t be plant-based, Vegetarian, or Vegan? Of course not! Like all eating lifestyles there are things to learn to keep you your healthiest. On the NKF page they have examples of what a low Oxalate Vegetarian plate would look like. I urge you to read it. You don’t want Oxalate Dumping either. Eating Oxalate rich foods with a good Calcium source will help the Oxalates be removed in the stool, not the kidneys.

My doctor has told me to avoid dairy products completely , or very little, which I have done for the past 4 years. I have done that, but whenever I try to go plant based I get weird symptoms to me that point to possible Oxalate buildup and when I avoid those high Oxalate foods my symptoms go away. Could be a coincidence, could be not.

Sign up for my newsletter below.

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Disclaimer